United States to send 200 soldiers to Jordan to help Jordanian army 1804131

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Defence & Security News - United States

 
 
Thursday, April 18, 2013, 10:36 AM
 
United States to send 200 soldiers to Jordan to help Jordanian army.
United States Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told Congress on Wednesday, April 18, 2013, that the Pentagon is sending about 200 soldiers from an Army headquarters unit to Jordan to assist efforts to contain violence along the Syrian border and plan for any operations needed to ensure the safety of chemical weapons in Syria.
     
United States Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told Congress on Wednesday, April 18, 2013, that the Pentagon is sending about 200 soldiers from an Army headquarters unit to Jordan to assist efforts to contain violence along the Syrian border and plan for any operations needed to ensure the safety of chemical weapons in Syria.
Two Jordanian soldiers discuss battle strategies, while a U.S. Soldier stands by in case an interpreter is needed, during a situational training exercise.
     

The move is part of the continuing cooperation between the Jordanian and the U.S. armies, especially in light of the worsening situation in Syria, Jordan's Minister of Media Affairs Mohammad Momani said.

Communications are underway between officials in the two countries to complete the process, he said.

Earlier this week, Jordan's Prime Minister Abdullah Ensour rejected reports as groundless that Jordan is providing military training to Syrian rebels who seek to topple Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Ensour denied the existence of any military or civil entity in Jordan that provides such training, or any center affiliated to foreign armies that does the job.

The 1st Armored Division troops are largely planners and will replace a similar number of U.S. forces that have been in Jordan for some months. They will include specialists in intelligence, logistics and operations.

Sending a cohesive headquarters unit will enhance the troops' ability to respond to any security needs, and will provide leadership personnel that could command additional forces if it's determined they are needed in the future.

 

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