U.S. is ready to launch alone military operations against Syria after use chemical weapons 3008133

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Defence & Security News - United States

 
 
Friday, August 30, 2013 10:56 AM
 
U.S. is ready to launch alone military operations against Syria after the use of chemical weapons.
The United States and its allies are pressing ahead with plans for punitive military attack on Syria as the U.N. chemical investigation team was still probing the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria. But at the same time, more and more countries have joined those opposing military intervention in the Mideast country, which is in a conflict for nearly two and half years.
     
The United States and its allies are pressing ahead with plans for punitive military attack on Syria as the U.N. chemical investigation team was still probing the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria. But at the same time, more and more countries have joined those opposing military intervention in the Mideast country, which has been dired in a conflict for nearly two and half years.
The US Navy is deploying a fifth Arleigh Burke class Destroyer, the USS Stout. into the eastern Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Syria.
     

Amid signs that the U.S. is ready to attack Syria, 140 members of the U.S. House of Representatives have signed onto a letter, demanding President Barack Obama get authorization of Congress before going ahead with the military strike.

"We strongly urge you to consult and receive authorization from Congress before ordering the use of U.S. military force in Syria," said the letter.

In the past days, the Obama administration has been preparing for a military strike on Syria, in response to the Syrian government's alleged use of chemical weapons in the eastern suburbs of Damascus on Aug. 21, which reportedly killed 1,300 people.

As part of his ongoing consultations with allies, Obama called German Chancellor Angela Merkel Thursday to discuss the Syria situation and possible international response.

Merkel has been stressing that she hopes to see a comprehensive political solution to the conflict. But her administration said "the Syrian government cannot hope to continue this kind of illegal warfare and go unpunished."

Obama also conversed over the phone with British Prime Minister David Cameron, the major U.S. ally in its previous wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, to coordinate their positions on Syria.

British MPs vetoed Thursday a possible military action against Syria after eight hours of intense debate. Cameron said he would "act accordingly" after the 285 to 272 vote, dealing a setback to U.S.-led efforts to punish Damascus.

Reacting to Washington's calls for military arrack on Syria, Russia has repeatedly voiced against possible military intervention in the country, saying it would undermine efforts for a political settlement and destabilize the Middle East.

 

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