United States may take further military action in South Sudan to support security US citizens 231213

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Defence & Security News - South Sudan

 
 
Monday, December 23, 2013 08:45 AM
 
United States may take further military action in South Sudan to support security of U.S. citizens.

United States President Barack Obama told congressional leaders Sunday, December 23, 2013, that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further military action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.”

     
United States President Barack Obama told congressional leaders Sunday, December 23, 2013, that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.”
An American soldier stands guard as a U.S. military aircraft on the runway in Juba awaits the arrival of American nationals being evacuated from South Sudan.

     

Four U.S. troops were injured in the evacuation mission Saturday when gunfire hit three military planes in Bor.

The U.S. and other countries have been evacuating their citizens from South Sudan. The U.S. has evacuated about 680 Americans and other foreign nationals so far, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said in a statement.

Fighting continued Sunday in South Sudan, where the country’s central government lost control of the capital of a key oil-producing state, the military said, as renegade forces loyal to a former deputy president seized more territory.

On Friday, the UN sent four helicopters to extract 40 UN peacekeepers from a base in Yuai, also in Jonglei, UN information officer Joe Contreras said. One helicopter was fired upon and executed an emergency landing in Upper Nile state. No casualties occurred.

South Sudan, which became independent in 2011 after decades of a brutal war with Sudan, has been plagued by ethnic discord, corruption and conflict with Sudan over oil revenues.

Although the south inherited three-quarters of Sudan's oil production when it declared independence in 2012, its oil exports are pumped through pipelines running north, raising concern a rebel takeover of southern oil fields could invite Sudan into the conflict.

 

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