New Russian-made RS-26 intercontinental ballistic missile could enter in service for 2016 2612141

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Defence & Security News - Russia

 
 
Friday, December 26, 2014 09:49 AM
 
New Russian-made RS-26 intercontinental ballistic missile could enter in service for 2016.
Russia’s newest RS-26 Rubezh missile system, dubbed the ‘anti-missile defense killer’, will join the ranks of the country’s defenses in less than two years, Russia’s Strategic Missile Force commander, Lt. Gen. Sergei Karakayev said. According Internet source, the new RS-26 intercontinental ballistic missile could be based on the RS-24 YARS.
     
Russia’s newest RS-26 Rubezh missile system, dubbed the ‘anti-missile defense killer’, will join the ranks of the country’s defenses in less than two years, Russia’s Strategic Missile Force commander, Lt. Gen. Sergei Karakayev said. According Internet source, the new RS-26 intercontinental ballistic missile could be based on the RS-24 YARS.
The new RS-26 Rubezh could be based on the RS-24 Yars nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile
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“We are continuing the test program for RS-26 and plan to finish it next year, with the missile to be put on combat duty in 2016,” Lt. Gen. Sergei Karakayev is cited as saying by RIA Novosti.

Previously, the Russian deputy prime minister in charge of defense, Dmitry Rogozin, referred to the RS-26 as “the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) killer.”

The RS-26 Rubezh is a solid-fuel missile with an advanced splitting warhead, which is launched from a mobile platform. It was designed at the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology, apparently under the codenames Rubezh (Frontier), or Avangard (Vanguard). According to RIA Novosti, the new missile has been test-fired previously on at least four occasions, with three tests registered as successful.

The last test launch was made on June 6, 2013, , the source said. This is the only launch that was officially confirmed by the Russian Ministry of Defense. No details about the missiles have been provided.

The first launch of RS-26 was carried out on September 27, 2011 from the Plesetsk cosmodrome in the Arkhangelsk region and ended with a failure. The missile fell about ten kilometers far from the launch pad.

The new RS-26 missile could be be carried on the new Belarus truck chassis MZKT-79291.

 

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