India to possibly supply weapons to Armenia amid escalating tensions in Caucasus


According to sources from The Economic Times, India is considering the possibility of supplying Armenia with a new batch of weapons and ammunition. However, nothing has been confirmed yet.
Follow Army Recognition on Google News at this link


Army Recognition Global Defense and Security news
The Indian ATAGS 155m Howitzer might be sold to the Armenian Army (Picture source: Indian MoD)


High-ranking Armenian officials have recently held talks in New Delhi concerning arms deliveries. These deliveries are expected to be based on contracts signed between the two nations in September 2022. The total value of these contracts amounts to 20 billion rupees or approximately 244.7 million dollars.

Previously, India had supplied Armenia with multi-barrel rocket launchers Pinaka, developed locally, marking the first time these systems were sold abroad. Anti-tank missiles and a batch of ammunition have also been delivered. These supplies were transported via a corridor through Iranian territory.

The Indian defense company Bharat Forge Ltd. delivered six 155 mm ATAGS howitzers to Armenia earlier in August, as part of a contract worth 155.5 million dollars. The agreement stipulates the delivery of 90 artillery howitzers of this type over a period of three years.

The Advanced Towed Artillery Gun System (ATAGS) is a cutting-edge towed howitzer developed in India. This artillery system was designed between 2013 and 2017 by a consortium of Indian organizations, including the Armament Research and Development Establishment, Tata Advanced Systems, and Kalyani Strategic Systems. The manufacturing of ATAGS began in 2019, with key players such as Advanced Weapons and Equipment India, Bharat Forge, and Tata Power SED contributing to its production.

Weighing 18 tons, the ATAGS has a barrel length of 8060 mm and is operated by a crew of 6 to 8 people. It features a caliber of 155 mm/52 Cal. One of the characteristics of the ATAGS is its automatic gun alignment and positioning system, complemented by a screw-type breech mechanism. The gun uses advanced recoil management systems, specifically electro-rheological and magneto-rheological technologies, to effectively manage the gun's recoil.

It has an elevation range based on a servo of -3 to +75 degrees and a traverse range of +/- 25 degrees within a diameter of 25 meters. The rate of fire is also noteworthy, with the ability to fire five shells in 60 seconds in burst mode, ten shells in two and a half minutes in intense mode, and to maintain a firing rate of 60 shells in one hour.

It can effectively target areas up to 48 km using high-range explosive-based ammunition. Even more notably, ongoing developments in ramjet-powered artillery shell technology aim to extend this range to over 60 km. The gun system also integrates an electrically operated ammunition feeding system and advanced aiming mechanisms, including thermal sights and displays for gunners, to enhance its operational efficiency.

India has already been a weapons supplier for Armenia. In 2020, New Delhi sold Yerevan four counter-battery radars named Swathi, worth 40 million dollars. Earlier this year, India, Iran, and Armenia formed a trilateral alliance to explore a transport corridor. Armenia has also signed a contract with the Indian defense company Kalyani Strategic System for the purchase of self-propelled artillery MArG 155. Additionally, Armenia is considering the acquisition of the Indian air defense system MR-SAM.