United States will send military trainers to African nations to help fight the rebels in Mali 210113

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Defence News - United States

 
 
Monday, January 21, 2013, 11:55 AM
 
United States will send military trainers to African nations to help fight the rebels in Mali.
The United States will send military trainers to African nations committed to dispatching troops to fight the Islamic militants in Mali. The news came as more African troops were being sent in to join the Malian and French troops in combating the militants who are running the northern part of the country and heading southward.
     
The United States will send military trainers to African nations committed to dispatching troops to fight the Islamic militants in Mali. The news came as more African troops were being sent in to join the Malian and French troops in combating the militants who are running the northern part of the country and heading southward.
U.S. Army Africa 1st Lt. Salvatore Buzzurro, Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance program military mentor, gives a Sierra Leone Armed Forces Soldiers advice on movement techniques. The SL Army has been training with the ACOTA program for two years, and this is the fifth company prepping for their peacekeeping mission in another country.
     

"Just to advise that our first ACOTA teams are en route to Africa and they will be on the continent by the weekend to start that," State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told reporters at a regular news briefing, adding they were not heading for Mali but the contributing nations to "prepare them for deployment."

The African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance (ACOTA) program aims to train military trainers and equip African national militaries to carry out peace support operations and humanitarian relief.

France waded in Mali's conflict last week by launching air strikes on targets of the militants, a move that is advancing the deployment of African troops to the West African nation as envisaged by the UN Security Council.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said Washington was still considering France's request for support as it shares the French goal of denying terrorists a safe haven in Mali and the region.

"We have some unique airlift capability and we are working with the French to provide them support in moving troops and equipment, " he said at a regular press briefing, noting Washington is providing intelligence support.

The bulk of the Africa-led intervention forces are expected to come from Nigeria, Niger, Senegal and Togo.

 

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