Israeli military is drawing plans future main battle tank with electromagnetic pulse cannon 1307124

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Defense News - Israel

 
 
Friday, July 13, 2012, 10:05 AM
 
Israeli military is drawing plans for its future main battle tank with electromagnetic pulse cannon.
The Israeli military is drawing plans for its future tank, The Jerusalem Post reported on Thursday, July 12, 2012. Among its main features, the tank, which the army hopes will roll off the assembly-lines in 2020, will be armed with a laser or an electromagnetic pulse cannon, powered by a hybrid engine and operated by a two-men crew, according to the report.
     
The Israeli military is drawing plans for its future tank, The Jerusalem Post reported on Thursday, July 12, 2012. Among its main features, the tank, which the army hopes will roll off the assembly-lines in 2020, will be armed with a laser or an electromagnetic pulse cannon, powered by a hybrid engine and operated by a two-men crew, according to the report.
Israeli Army Merkava IV main battle tank with Trophy active protection system against anti-tank missile
     

A team of engineers and combat officers launched the project last year under the aegis of the Ground Forces Command's Weapons Development Division. Its members include personnel from the Armored Corps and the Defense Ministry's Merkava program.

"When we look at what the future tank will look like, we need to look broadly at all technology that exists," Brig. Gen. Yigal Slovik, outgoing commander of the Armored Corps, told the Post.

Electromagnetic and laser cannon technology is already available, but Slovik noted that such weapons are "too big and not applicable."

"The tank will ultimately be faster, better protected, more interoperable and more lethal," he said.

The future tank is slated to succeed the Merkava, widely considered to be one of the best tanks currently in service. The Merkava IV, the most advanced in the Israeli arsenal, is particularly renowned for its armor and maneuverability.

While the conventional battlefield is gradually becoming obsolete, Israel is investing considerable resources in upgrading its armored forces.

Last month, the army completed outfitting the 401st Brigade, one of two that operate the Merkava IV, with Windbreaker, a radar- based kinetic armor defense system designed to track and intercept anti-tank missiles, armor-piercing shells and rocket-propelled grenades.

The system, marketed abroad as Trophy, fires miniature interceptor missiles made up of metal slugs at the incoming projectile, detonating its warhead a safe distance from the tank. It is also capable of spotting the area from which the projectile was fired and shooting back at the enemy.

In March last year, the system first intercepted RPGs fired at an Israeli tank patrolling the border with Gaza.

 

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