All the women will be able to serve in infantry and armour units of British army 10807163

Defence & Security Industry News - United Kingdom
 
All the women will be able to serve in infantry and armour units of British army.
David Cameron is to remove the ban on women serving in ground combat roles in the British military. The Prime Minister will announce that women will be able to serve in infantry and armour units after the service chiefs last month unanimously recommended the move following a detailed study of the issue. (Source Telegraph UK)
     
David Cameron is to remove the ban on women serving in ground combat roles in the British military. The Prime Minister will announce that women will be able to serve in infantry and armour units after the service chiefs last month unanimously recommended the move following a detailed study of the issue. (Source Telegraph UK) A female British soldier of Juliet Company, CIMIC (Civil Military Co-operation) is pictured on patrol in Lashkar Gah. ( Photo courtesy of MOD/Crown Copyright)
     
Source said the Prime Minister is expected to announce the move at the Nato Warsaw summit this weekend.

A phased relaxation of the ban will see jobs in tank units open to women within a year and infantry jobs opened up later.

Women are currently banned from ground combat units “where the primary role is to close with and kill the enemy”. The rule means women are barred from infantry battalions, armoured regiments and the Royal Marines.

Internal reviews led by Gen Sir Nick Carter, Chief of the General Staff, have spent two years looking at whether women are physically strong and tough enough to serve in frontline infantry units, and whether they are more prone to injury.

At the end of 2015, United States have also open all combat positions for the women including Special Forces, Marines Corps, Airborne troops, infantry etc.

In December 2015, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced that all U.S. military combat positions are being opened up to women. Carter's historic announcement comes after years-long reviews, and after public push-back from the Marine Corps, which had sought exceptions to keep positions such as infantry, machine gunner, fire support and reconnaissance to men.
 

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