Iran to unveil its new local-made Hormuz mobile launcher vehicle with Zelzal ballistic missiles 1205

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Defence & Security News - Iran

 
 
Monday, May 11, 2014 02:49 PM
 
Iran to unveil its new local-made Hormuz mobile launcher vehicle with Zelzal ballistic missiles.
The Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) Aerospace Force has unveiled a new local-made Multiple Reentry Vehicle (MRV) SRBM (Short-Range ballistic Missile) called Hormuz equipped with short-range Zelzal ballistic missiles. The surface-to-surface Zelzal missile is equipped with thirty 17-kg bombs which can destroy a wide range of targets and is a proper option for targeting airport runways and equipments, installations and facilities on the ground.
     
The Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) Aerospace Force has unveiled a new local-made Multiple Reentry Vehicle (MRV) SRBM (Short-Range ballistic Missile) called Hormuz equipped with short-range Zelzal ballistic missiles.
Iranian-made Hormuz launch unit armed with Zelzal short-range surface-to-surface ballistic missile
     
Zelzal was unveiled on Sunday in the presence of Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei in a two-hour tour of the IRGC's Aerospace Exhibition, where state-of-the-art equipment and hardware were showcased.

The missile was earlier test-fired in 2011 during the drills, codenamed Payambar-e Azam (The Great Messenger) 6, but it was then armed with regular payloads.

In the drills, 9 Zelzal missiles were fired concurrently by triple launchers. The launchers granted the country the ability to fire larger numbers of Zelzal missiles with a much shorter time needed for doing preparations.

A Multiple Reentry Vehicle payload for a ballistic missile deploys multiple warheads in a pattern against a single target. (As opposed to Multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle, which deploys multiple warheads against multiple targets.) The advantage of an MRV over a single warhead is that the damage produced in the center of the pattern is far greater than the damage possible from any single warhead in the MRV cluster, this makes for an efficient area attack weapon. Also, the sheer number of Warheads make interception by Anti-ballistic missiles unlikely.

Improved warhead designs allow smaller warheads for a given yield, while better electronics and guidance systems allowed greater accuracy. As a result MIRV technology has proven more attractive than MRV for advanced nations. Because of the larger amount of nuclear material consumed by MRVs and MIRVs, single warhead missiles are more attractive for nations with less advanced technology. The United States deployed an MRV payload on the Polaris A-3. The Soviet Union deployed MRVs on the SS-9 Mod 4 ICBM. Refer to atmospheric reentry for more details.

 

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