Taiwan plans to purchase 120 American-made M1A1 Abrams tanks to replace old M60A3 MBT 13005152

Defence & Security News - Taiwan
 
Taiwan plans to purchase 120 American-made M1A1 Abrams tanks to replace old M60A3 MBT.
The Ministry of National Defense of Taiwan said it would stick to a plan to buy 120 US-made M1A1 Abrams tanks in an estimated NT$33 billion (US$1.08 billion) deal. The Republic of China (ROC) Army Command Headquarters Office said the program’s budget allocation would be made in 2017, with delivery expected to begin in 2020.
     
The Ministry of National Defense of Taiwan said it would stick to a plan to buy 120 US-made M1A1 Abrams tanks in an estimated NT$33 billion (US$1.08 billion) deal. The Republic of China (ROC) Army Command Headquarters Office said the program’s budget allocation would be made in 2017, with delivery expected to begin in 2020. An M1A1 Abrams tank is driven on a tank course by Iraqi soldiers with the 9th Iraqi Army Division instructed by U.S. Soldiers with Delta Company, 3rd Battalion, 69th Armored Regiment, 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division in Joint Security Station Al Rashid, Iraq.
     
The army of Taiwan plans to purchase 120 second-hand M1A1 tanks from the US military to replace Taiwan’s aging M60A3 and CM-11 “Brave Tiger” main battle tanks and bolster infantry divisions’ combat strength.

Upon delivery, the 120 tanks are to constitute two battalions for deployment at the main ROC infantry base in Hsinchu County’s Hukou Township, which is tasked with the defense of the capital, Taipei, and northern Taiwan, army officials said.

The original plan was to buy the newer M1A2 tank, which has enhanced electronics and weapons control systems, but it came at a higher price tag, officials said.

The ministry elected to go with M1A1s for the estimated expense of NT$33 billion.

Officials said this follows the path taken by Australia, which upgraded its infantry with second-hand M1A1 tanks that had been kept in storage.

The US performed complete performance tests and systems checks before delivery, it added.

The ministry said it has already made public its intention to pursue the plan, with a tender announcement — labeled as project TLP04001 and calling for the procurement of new main battle tanks — placed on the government’s official procurement Web site.

However, the tender notice did not include the estimated price, or the total number of tanks by the military.

An army official who requested anonymity said the post served to conform with the Government Procurement Act, and referred to the purchase of US M1A1 tanks.
 

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