North Korea to develop road-mobile ICBM intercontinental ballistic missile that could threaten U.S.

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Defence & Security News - North Korea

 
 
Saturday, September 27, 2014 08:04 PM
 
North Korea to develop road-mobile ICBM intercontinental ballistic missile that could threaten U.S.
North Korea's military is taking steps to field a road-mobile intercontinental ballistic missile that could threaten the United States, the head of American forces in the Pacific says. In an interview with Bloomberg Government, Admiral Locklear, commander of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) delivered some information regarding North Korea’s unconventional yet threatening military capabilities.
     
North Korea's military is taking steps to field a road-mobile intercontinental ballistic missile that could threaten the United States, the head of American forces in the Pacific says. In an interview with Bloomberg Government, Admiral Locklear, commander of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) delivered some information regarding North Korea’s unconventional yet threatening military capabilities.
North Korea missiles arsenal
     

The missile, which isn’t operational yet and is designed to be transported on roads, threatens to change relations between the U.S. and a nation once feared primarily for its conventional military and fixed long-range intercontinental missiles such as the Taepo-Dong-2.

Admiral Locklear added that their new ICBMs will be designed so they could be launched from pads that are mobile and can be fired from roads. The mobile missiles are of the KN-08 (“Hwaseong 13”) class that are unlike the previous “Daepo” or “Nodong” missiles that could only be fired from fixed launch pads.

Admiral Locklear noted that the development of this new system is growing into a new threat that is bringing about change to North Korean and U.S. political relationships.

The reason why mobile ICBMs are such a greater threat compared to more traditional ballistic missiles that are launched from fixed launch pads is that the former are much harder to detect and predict where they will come from.

 

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