US Army performed airdrop certification of LAV-25A2 light armored vehicle


In January 2018, Airborne Calvary Scout Soldiers of U.S. Army have conducted airdrop certification testing on the Light Armored Vehicle LAV-25A2. During the test, Soldiers of the 82nd's 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 5th Squadron 73rd Cavalry Regiment, rigged the LAV-25A2 for airdrop and recovery and conducted live fire exercises to ensure the system was fully operational.


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The LAV-25A2 successfully lands on Sicily Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Jim Finney, Audio Visual Specialist, Airborne and Special Operations Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Public Affairs)


Three successful airdrops are required for final certification by the Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Command (NSRDEC) in Natick, Massachusetts.

Other tests underway at ABNSOTD include an airdrop certification of the Air Droppable Airfield Damage Repair Kit and Caster Assisted A-Series Delivery System (CAADS) and the Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV 1.1). Highly-instrumented test drops by ABNSOTD will help test overall survivability of the vehicles in airborne operations.

The introduction of the LAV-25A2 into the XVIII Airborne Corps' Global Response Force is an exercise to develop tactics, techniques and procedures for a light airdrop capable Mobile Protective Firepower platform of the future to replace the legacy Sheridan M551, which was phased out of the 82nd Airborne Division in 1996.

The US Marine Corps has developed a special purpose kit to improve protection from under vehicle attacks. This kit (known as the D-Kit) is designed to work with the ballistic protection upgrade package (BPUP) and is installed at the discretion of the operational commander.


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The LAV-25A2 descends under seven G-11C parachutes over Sicily Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Jim Finney, Audio Visual Specialist, Airborne and Special Operations Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Public Affairs)


A Service Life Extension Program was initiated by the Marine Corps in FY05 primarily to address obsolescence deficiencies. The Marine Corps undertook the Survivability Upgrade I program based on an Urgent Need Statement from the operating forces. This upgrade became the LAV A2 configuration standard, and involved developing and installing a BPUP, power pack enhancements upgraded suspension, and other modifications.

The LAV A2 D-Kit is designed to work with the previously installed BPUP system and is a special purpose mission kit used in theatre at the discretion of the operational commander. The BPUP provides armor protection to the sides and roof of the vehicle, whereas the D-Kit provides additional armor protection with a V-shaped hull under the vehicle.


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