Russia hopes multi-billions military contracts and enhanced technical cooperation with Iran TASS 20712153

Defence & Security News - Russia
 
Russia hopes multi-billions military contracts and enhanced technical cooperation with Iran
Russia hopes to expand military and technical cooperation with Iran considerably after all restrictions on arms sales to the Islamic Republic are lifted, Russian presidential aide for military and technical cooperation Vladimir Kozhin said on Monday. Russia and Iran may sign contracts worth billions of US dollars, he said in an interview with Izvestiya newspaper.
     
Russia hopes multi billions military contracts and enhanced technical cooperation with Iran 640 001With all restrictions lifted with the Islamic Republic, Russia may sign massive military contracts with Iran
     
"When all restrictions and all sanctions are lifted, I think we will progress quite considerably in the sphere of military and technical cooperation. It is partially developing for products uncovered by sanctions and we hope for very big projects in future," Kozhin said.

"The interest of Iran is great. They need to upgrade virtually all their armed services and branches seriously in all areas. All Iranian armed forces require modernization. Big contracts worth billions of US dollars will be signed, taking into account that this is a large country with numerous armed forces," the Russian presidential aide said.

As Kozhin said earlier, Russia is starting to deliver S-300 (NATO reporting name: SA-10 Grumble) air defense missile systems to Iran under the contract, which was suspended following sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council.

A new contract for the delivery of S-300 systems to Iran came into effect in early November. The contract was signed after Russian President Vladimir Putin lifted the ban in the spring of 2015 on the delivery of S-300 systems to Teheran.

It was reported earlier that Iran would receive the S-300PMU-2 version of the S-300 air defense missile system.

According to Kozhin, Iran is interested in all Russian-made military hardware along with S-300 air defense missile systems.

Russia was the biggest supplier of military hardware and equipment to Iran in 1992-2014.

In 1992-2014, Russia delivered military hardware and equipment worth $3.469 billion to Iran, which made up 45% of the Iranian arms imports in that period.

Iran both purchased Russian-made military hardware and produced it under the Russian license.

In 1992-2014, Iran manufactured 300 T-72S1 main battle tanks, 331 BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicles, 4,450 9M14M Malyutka-M anti-tank missiles, 4,950 9M111 Fagot anti-tank missiles for BMP-2 vehicles, 2,800 9M113 Konkurs anti-tank missiles and 100 D-30 guns under the Russian license.

Russia delivered 122 T-72S1 main battle tanks, 82 BMP-2 infantry combat vehicles, 3 Project 877E diesel-electric submarines, 304 V-46 diesel engines and 2 battalions of 2K12 Kvadrat air defense missile systems with 120 3M9 surface-to-air missiles to Iran.

Iran also received 42 Mil Mi-171Sh (Hip) multipurpose helicopters, 5 search and rescue versions of the Mi-8MT/Mi-17 (Hip) multipurpose helicopters, 500 9M114 Shturm anti-tank missiles, 130 fighting cabins for BMP-2 vehicles and 6 Sukhoi Su-25T (Frogfoot) attack aircraft, including 3 Su-25UBK aircraft with 40 R-60 air-to-air missiles from Russia.

In 1992-2014, Russia also delivered 29 Tor-M1 air defense missile systems with 750 9M338 surface-to-air missiles, 2 1L119 Nebo search radars, 2 Kasta-2E2 search radars and 2 1L222 Avtobaza electronic reconnaissance and jamming systems to Iran.
     
© Copyright 2015 TASS. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 

 

Cookies settings

×

Functional Cookies

This site uses cookies to ensure its proper functioning and cannot be deactivated from our systems. We don't use them not for advertising purposes. If these cookies are blocked, some parts of the site will not work.

Session

Please login to see yours activities!

Other cookies

This website uses a number of cookies to manage, for example: user sessions.